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Chester Progressive
Chester , California
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January 15, 1949     Chester Progressive
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January 15, 1949
 

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***--************--********* I G R A N G E M E M B E R S I N ST A L L " /HOME ECONOMICS OFFICERS : lirU I T&Y d[lllllY;dl :/ Installation of officers for th, : Al- lbl&VA m: J, dF',dm iillllllp :Ipresen t year was the principal or-  Ider of business at the regular ses- lsion of the Indian Valley Grange PJNTAPV DIIRIIF . ! RP.;II qTRN/W_ AD -lon Tuesday, January 4. lnasmucl: L$ zul /tJUaJl dIJlJ U|lUllIJru 111141 ] as District Debut,, Rudolph Ram- * T " . e!li of Vinton was unable 12o b( , ypmg - Leases - Deeds - Contracts, etc. , present to serve as installing of * Mmma Forms. Proof of Labor et- ., ficer, the following Grange mem- : " " '" :[ bern conducted the ceremony: : O O O : Past Master Mark Herring, in- MhRGUERITE AUSTIN ,ole,00ooo : 8- M" 4 : galJa bearer; Guy Defanti, emblem H,ours: 11 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. . * Hall Block from High School - Crescent Street - Greenville } ************************************************* NO. of Bank -- 541 COMBINED REPORT OF CONDITION OF THE INDIAN VALLEY BANK LOCATED AT GREENVILLE, CALIFORNIA as of the close of business on the 31st day of December, t948 ASSETS COM"ERClAL SAVINGS COMBINED Cash, balances with other banks, and cash items in process of collection ........................................ 266,992.28 66,280.34 333,272.62 U. S. Government obligations, di- rect and fully guaranteed ............ 628,366.83 350,580.37 978,947.20 State, county, municipal and school district obligations .......... 90,702.53 41,040.97 131,743.50 Loans and discounts ........................ 205,702.97 10,200.00 215,902.97 Real estate loans .............................. 328,069.03 328,069.03 Overdrafts .......................................... 1.380.18 1,380.18 Bank premises, furniture, fix- tures and equipment .................... 750.00 750.00 Other assets ...................................... 63.80 63.80 Total Assets ...................................... 1,193,958.59 796,170.71 1,990,129.30 LIABILITIES Commercial deposits--demand ...... 1,094,841.65 1,094,841.65 Savings deposits ............................... 709,420.71 709,420.7] U. S. Government and postal sav- ings deposits ................................ 19,300.27 19,300.27 State, county and municipal de- posits .............................................. 1,846.81 50,000.00 51,846.81 Other liabilities .................................. 36.70 36.70 Total Liabilities ................................ 1,116,025.43 759,420.71 1,875,446.14 CAPITAL ACCOUNTS Capital paid in: a. Class A preferred stock .......... None None b. Class B preferred stock .......... None None c. Common sock--500 shares, Par $100.00 ................................ 27,500.00 22,500.00 50,000.00 Surplus ................................................ 19,250.00 14,250.00 33,500.00 Undivided profits--net .................... 31,183.16 31,183.16 Total Capital Accounts .................... 77,933.16 36,750.00 114,683.16 TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS ...... 1,193,958.59 796,170.71 1,990,129.30 MEMORANDA: Assets Pledged to Secure Liabilities Pledged assets (and securities loaned) {book value) : a. U. S. Government obligations pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities .......................... 110,000.00 STATE OF CALIFORNIA, County of Plumas, U. W. B. PFRRY, President CECILIA M. CHAMBERLAIN, Cashier (Secretary) of The Indian Valley Bank, Greenville, California, being duly sworn, each for themselves, say they have a personal knowledge of the mat- ters contained in the foregoing report of condition and schedules per- taining thereto and that every allegation, statement, matter and thing therein eontained is true to the best of their knowledge and belief. W. B. PIRRY, President CECILIA M. CHAMBERLAIN, Cashier (Secretary) Severally subscribed and sworn to before me by both deponents this llth day of January, 1949. ESTELLA W. PdR.ASHAtS Notary Public in and for said County of Plumas, State f California. No. of Bank---541. My commission expires April 28, 1951. MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION stalliug officer; Della Herring, marshall; Elsie Ann -lannon, re- bearer. Mrs. Doris Bush heads the Home Economics Club of the Grange as chairman for 1949, with. Arlene Taresh elected to the office of vice- chairman, Molly Wing as secretary and Charlotte Hannon, treasurer. These officers succeed Molly Wing. lean Mullen, Doris Bush and Della Herring in the respeCtive offices. The next regular meeting of the Indian Valley Grange will be on Tuesday next, January 18, at the Taylorsville Hall. All members are requested to bring some arti- cle of food for the potluck supper which ibllows the meeting. NEW PASTOR ARRIVES FOR ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH Rev. and Mrs. Vernon H. Rags- dale arrived in Greenville Wednes- day evening to assume the past, or- ship of the Bethany Assembly (Assembly of God) church, replac- ing V. D. (Duke) Kelly, who has returned to his former home at Pacific Grove. The Ragsdale's who have a two- year-old daughter and five-year- old twins, have taken up residence in the church parsonage, and he will devote part of his time t,o taking care of the school bus run dcvn Feather River Canyon. The new minister comes here from Gait, but has served in this district previously and has visited Greenville a number of times. FRANK CLARK REPORTED IN BATSON HOSPITAL NOW Frank M. Clark, who has been living for some time past with his son and family at Quincy, is re- ported to be confined to the Bat- son Itospital in Greenville, where he is undergoing medical observa- tion and treatment. 4 BACK FROM 3-WEEKS TRIP Mr. and Mrs. Rollin Ellis and daughter Jo returned last Friday from a 3 weeks vacation trip to Oklahoma where they spent the holiday season visiting their par- ents and other relatives. Juanita reports they had a wonderful time and thoroughly enjoyed spring weather until they got home. MANES FUI00RAL HOME Telephone 75-M-2 GREENVILLE. CALIFORNIA Building Costs Are Geing iDown'. Refrigerators oo0 G E PHILC0 Stoves Ironers Automatic Washers and a full line of small appliances and tools o o 0 DUO. THERM 01L HEATERS Radios Dimension Lumber Reduced $10 & i Builders' Suppl0000 division Of COLLINS PINE COMPANY CHESTER CALIFORNIA FOR SALE CMBINATC'N ELCT:RIC pipe thawer and 'buzz box" arc welder. Never been used. See Art Sorsoli, Crescent Mills, or at Eert's Place, Greenville. 43-tfc FIVE hp. oil burning Steammaste i boiler; completely automatic, with controls. $500. Red Logan, Cres- cent Mills. 44-2c '70-I ALE-OIL SPACE trEAT- ER for three or four room house: in g'ood condition. Phone 58-M-5 after 2 o'clock P.M. lp SALE - GARAGE business and Chevron Service station; stock ]and 3-year lease. Doing good .bus-i incus. Fred Brock, Belden. lpl SEIGLE OIL HEATER for sale; large size; ALSO 5V:z-ft. bath tub. Record office, phone 39-M. lp WILL SELL my '41 Studebaker Champion 2-t, one deluxe business coupe for $800, or trade for Willys Jeep of equal value. Charles Wal- k-.ors, BOX 461, Greenville. 44p 1948 CHEVROLET Fleet Master Club coupe; has radio, heater and other accessories; driven only 4000 miles. Owner, phone 334-J, Quincy. i Berle Brents, Box 773, Quincy. 44p CABIN on 35x100-foot lot for sale in Greenville; needs to be plumbed; will sell for $910, $40 down, bal- ance $30 month. Telephone Green- ville 32-M-2. 42x POWIR WOOD ,SAW with Star engine, $50; ALSO 4-cyl. 1928 Dodge engine $25. G. L. Van Ronk, phone Greenville 78-M-2. tfc 5-1OOM HOUSE including elec. range, water heater. 6-ft. elec re- frigerator, oil htr. . C. Wassell phone 72-M-2. Greenville. 41-tfc THGIROBRED AIRDALE PUP- PIES for sale, $10. -- Inquire Q. PHILPOTT, or phone Greenville 32-M-4. 29-2c 1931 ].ODEL A roadster; good tires; general condition fair. $100 cash for quick sale.--E. L. Bean, Collins-Pine mill, Chester, or call at Record office, Greenville. 28-if LARGE SIZE DURO-THERM oil heater, $40. Inquire at Mercer's No. 2 Market, Greenville.--Myrtle Glenn. 42p 3-RO,O HOUSE with bath; ALSO 2-room house; large double garage situated on 3-acre tract in Green- ville Townsite on Hot Springs road. See F. M. Clarke or inquire at the Indian Valley Bank. 35-tfc WANTED I HOaSES WANTED FOR FOX FEED. -- FEATHER RIVER FOX FARMS, ALMANOR. 29-tfc pART T :ME housework or caring for children wanted. Mrs. Ben Willis. phone Greenville 72-M-3. x MISCELLANEOUS Dr. C. F. COMPTON, Susanville Chiropractor; specializes in chron- ic and acute sinus ailments--quick relief and in time permanent cure. Send for free booklet on sinus dis- ease. Also Neuritis, Lumbago, Chronic and Nervous ailments, and after effects in accidents. Dr. C. F. Compton, D.C., 710 Main Street, Susanville. Phone 329-B. 27-tfc IMMEDIATE DELIVERY on new Electrolux Vacuum Cleaners -- all metal; pre-war price, $69.75 comp]ete. Terms available. Write W. R. Folkes, Box 23, Susanville, California. Phone 296-Y. tfc TYPEWRITERS, ADDING MA- CHINES, CLEANED and OVER- HAULED. Prompt service; work guaranteed. Repair loan while your maohine is in Service Dept.Oro- ville Typewriter Co., 3204 Palermo Road, phone 1431, Oroville. (21tfc It's time to start making plans for the new yea-for a student, or nurse, or any- one who would appreoiate a typewriter  and about any- one would--we suggest you drop into 3204 Palermo Rd. at Oroville . . . a type- writer costs less than you thinkl We have Underwood, Smith-Corona., Remington, and Royal Portables! "A Typewriter Specialist Can Serve You Better" OROVILLE TYPEWRITER CO. A1 Topaz, owner 3204 Palermo Rd. - Ph. 1431 Open Saturdays from 9 to 6 'HE CHESTER PR0RESSIVE. -- SATURDAY, JAN. i5th, 40 THE WEATHER A s the snow begins ,o thaw and he icicles drop from the eaves, the cditor is reminded of the days 'mt following World War I, when ' made an inauspicious start in vspapering at Monroe, Wash. :,cent radio reports advise that he citizens of Monroe had fears )f frozen water pipes this year, ;:oo, so like many others they left their faucets open all night and ometimes all day . . Result-- 'hey ,ke up yesterday mornin7 o find their reservoirs completely lry-no water for drinking, cook- -g or fire fighting! ccording to Bidwell, there's a moral to th.is omewhere, and it is most likely !.o show up when another cold spell strikes, foil, owed by a serious fire=as could happen any time! TEMPERATURES 6 .............................. 7 27 7 .............................. 12 36 8 .............................. 15 34 9 (coldest day) 10 18 10 ................ : ............. 2 21 11 ..... v: ...................... 6 27 12 ............. t ............... 1 34 13 ............................... 13 DINE AT TAYLORSVILLE INN Mr. and Mrs. Solon Luzzadder of Quincy, and Mis Hattie Firm- stone of Greenville, were dinner guests at the Taylorsville Inn on Sunday evening. TAYLORSVILLE TOPICS BY THE RAMBLER One ,of the happiest teen-agers in Indian Valley is Wilma Dolphin. This summer when Wilma was over at FARo she purchased a new riding horse. "Rip" Stead made a trip over and brought it home, so now, even though the weather isn't ideal, Wilma can frequently be seen exercising her new mount. It's funny, but when the sun hines for an hour or two you see different residents of Taylorsville ,gut looking around their yards. Could they be looking for snow- drops? No names are mentioned as to who these o0timists are. Ricky Geist is back at school after having a bout with a severe cold. ,luth Cliff went back to school i the ,other day, with LRoberta! She] found the visit so interesting that I instead of tspending an hour as I )lanned, she spent the day. ] --'k-- ! Jack Sherick found that the floser he got to Los Angeles on his return home after the holi- days, the colder he got. He reports that being held up on the Ridge Route for several hours due to a blizzard, made him appreciate our ,feather more. The residents of Taylorsville are doing "nip-ups" daily on the road to and from town. It seems that the snow plows missed a bet before what i called "the big freeze" set in. Are the townspeople mad! Dan Brown, who commutes be- tween Taylorsville and the project down the river, met vith a mishap on his way to work the other morning. His pickup, "the yellow menace," is taking time out since it met up with a ,big boulder on he highway. TYPING PAPER AND SECOND SHEETS--at the Record office. LINE FOR LINE By CLINKENBEARD CLEWS THE NEW YEAR'S HRE. AND TI-LT'S FO'I :SU. ND NOW IT LOOKS. AS THOUGH 'TWILL t?E. ANOTHER WHICH. WILL LINGEIR ON. IN MEMORY. FOR MANY MORE. WITH SNOW ANteD CLD. AND PLENTY M0E. UNIISUAL THINGS. GOING ON THROUGHOUT. OUR U. S. A. AN]9 IT COULD BE. WiE'LL HAVE STHL MORE. &ND MAE ANTHief. REC:0D FOR. OUR WINTER CLIME. iID THEN AGAIN. ,SOME O US HOE. IT'LL ,SOON CLEAR U'. AND BREAK OUT WITTI. AN EARLY SPRING. SO 'IV]RYONE. CAN GET TO WORK. %ND CROPS CAiN GOW. AND WOKINGM,N. A.ND FA/I]I, TOO. CAN PAY UP ANY. ILLS TIY HAVE. AND W (DAN ALL. REMEMBFA THAT. IT'S LOCAL FOLK. THAT STAND BEHIID. AND SEE US THROUGH. LEAN WINTERS AD. SU(H OTI-LI% TIMES. AS %rE MAY FIN]). OUR CASH IS ON. AND IT "WON'T MATTBIR. VErY MUCH. WHICH /'ARTY IS. IN POWER HERE. OR A2q YWI-E. ]IF W JUST LIVE. TO BUILD THE TOW. WE CIALL OUR H.(:LM. WE T YOU NW! I President Truman delivered his message on "Tthe State of the Na- tion" last week and Governor Earl Warren issued his annual re- )ort: "Condition of the State" . . . Both, it appears, could be worse, have been worse and possibly will be worse at some future date .... Just how far in the future m'ay de- pend on what congress and ur state legislature do at presentl --'A'-- I Washington will lean quite far to the left during the coming four years, in an efi)ort to give the voters of the nation a higher de- gree of security and economic pro- tection, and it seems likely tat state governments will follow the pattern as best they can. Liberal- ization of labor regul'atlon; boost- ed social security provisions; larg- er unemployment insurance, old age and "needy" benefits are gen- erally assured so far as Congress is concerned, and some form of national medical insurance and price regulation is apparently al- most a certainty. Be as skeptical as you choose, but the fact remains, however, that a more intelligent effort is being made today, by more cap- able men than ever before, to es- I tablish a basis on which world :peace can be maintained . . . it's something t,o be grateful for--that an unselfish few can foresee the necessity of protecting humanity from itself! ooooooooeoeeeoo.ooooooooooooooooeoooooooeoooooooo i DR. RALPH FRENCH .: : OPTOMETRIST i i ANNOUNCE00 THE OPEN,NG " OF HIS OFFICE IN QUINCY COMPLETE EYE EXAMINATION - OPTICAL REPAIRS e e Hours: 10 a.m. to" 6 p.m. Evenings by Appointment e e 156 Jaokson Street Telephone 21-M e OPPOSITE INDUSTRIAL HOSPITAL e e 000000000000000000000000000 0000000eeee'l Blew my top the other morning when I discovered a shirt I'd put on had two cuttons missing. "Joe," the missus says, "do you ever 'ead what you write? For a mau who writes newspaper pieces all about tolerance, you sometimes show a lot of race prejudice." "Race prejudice !" I hollers. "No one can accuse me of that." "I mean prejudice against the entir human race," she interrupts with a smile. "Why get mad at the world over two little buttons?" That took the wind out of me. From where I sit (as I told the missus that evening), a lot of us sometimes get too worked up over little things.., little differenees o opinion or taste. One person pre- fers beer or ale, another prefers eider or lemonade. But why ritt-" elze the other fellow just because his tastes aren't the same as ore's? "That sounds more like you, Joe,  she laughs, snipping off a thread. (It so happens she was sewing on buttons.)